Individual and Neighborhood Influences on the Relationship Between Waist Circumference and Coronary Heart Disease in the REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke Study

Academic Article

Abstract

  • Introduction The objective of this study was to describe how the relationship between waist circumference and incident coronary heart disease (CHD) is influenced by individual and neighborhood factors in the REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study. Methods REGARDS is a cohort study of 30,239 US adults. The primary exposure was sex-specific quartiles of waist circumference. Individual covariates included sociodemographic characteristics, health status, health behavior, and usual source of care. Neighborhood (ie, zip code–level) covariates included access to primary care, poverty, rurality, and racial segregation. The main outcome was incident CHD from baseline (2003) through 2017. We used descriptive statistics, Kaplan–Meier curves, and Cox proportional hazard models to analyze the overall sample and race–sex subgroups. Results During the study period, 23,042 study participants had 1,499 CHD events. We found a higher risk of incident CHD in the upper quartile of waist circumference compared with the first quartile in all 4 race–sex subgroups except African American men, among whom we found no relationship between waist circumference and incident CHD. Covariates did not attenuate these relationships. Conclusion In all groups except African American men, waist circumference in the highest quartile was associated with increased risk of incident CHD. Individual and neighborhood factors did not influence the relationship between waist circumference and development of CHD but differentially influenced incident CHD among race–sex subgroups.
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    Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • Gaglioti AH; Rivers D; Ringel JB; Judd S; Safford MM
  • Volume

  • 19