Association of Mental Health Disorders and Aortic Dissection

Academic Article

Abstract

  • Introduction: Mental health disorders (MHD), including substance abuse, have been associated with aortic dissection (AD). Aneurysmal degeneration in the residual untreated aorta after both open and endovascular treatment is not uncommon in AD. Thus, diligent long-term follow-up is necessary and MHD may play a role in treatment plan and surveillance. The impact of MHD on management, outcomes and follow-up after AD treatment is unknown and here we sought to evaluate these associations. Methods: A retrospective review was performed on all patients diagnosed with Stanford Type A and B dissections from 2008 to 2018 at a tertiary referral center. MHD was defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V). Patient demographics, procedural characteristics, and outcomes were analyzed. Results: A total of 649 non-traumatic aortic dissections were identified in the study timeframe. The cohort consisted of 51% Type A (n = 334) dissection and 49% Type B (n = 315) dissection. Mental health disorders were present in 49.3% of the cohort. Notably, the timing of MHD diagnosis relative to development of AD is unknown in the majority of patients. Within the Type A population, a MHD was present in 50.6% (N = 162) of patients, of which the most common indication for MHD was the presence of antidepressant or antipsychotic medication (28.6%). In patients with Type A dissections, the presence of a MHD did not significantly affect the rate of index hospitalization intervention (68%) or long-term mortality (12.5% in patients with a MHD). Within the Type B population, a MHD was present in 49.4% (n = 158) of patients, of which the most common indication for MHD was the presence of antidepressant or antipsychotic medication (30.5%). In patients with Type B dissections, the presence of a MHD did not significantly affect the rate of index hospitalization intervention (50.3% in patients with a MHD) or long-term mortality (10.1% in patients with a MHD). The overall participation in follow-up care was not significantly decreased based on the presence of a MHD compared to those without a MHD (1.66 ± 2.16 years vs. 1.68 ± 2.20 years, P = 0.93). Conclusion: MHD is more prevalent in AD patients than in the general population, but demonstrating a causal relationship between MHD and development/progression of ADis challenging. Despite a high prevalence of MHD in AD patients, in-hospital mortality and follow-up compliance was similar to non-MHD patients.
  • Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • Blakeslee-Carter J; Menon AJ; Novak Z; Spangler EL; Beck AW; McFarland GE
  • Start Page

  • 217
  • End Page

  • 225
  • Volume

  • 77