Evaluation of the Braden scale in predicting surgical outcomes in older patients undergoing major head and neck surgery

Academic Article

Abstract

  • Background: Being able to predict negative postoperative outcomes is important for helping select patients for treatment as well for informed decision-making by patients. Frailty measures are often time and resource intensive to use as screening measures, whereas the Braden scale, a commonly used measure to assess patients at risk of developing pressure ulcers after surgery, may be a potential tool to predict postoperative complication rates and longer length of stay (LOS) in patients undergoing major head and neck cancer surgery. Methods: A retrospective analysis of Braden scale scores was performed on a prospectively collected cohort of patients undergoing major head and neck surgery recruited between December 2011 and April 2014. The association of Braden scale score with the primary outcomes of complications and LOS was analyzed using logistic regression and linear regression models on univariate analysis (UVA), respectively. Multivariate analysis (MVA) was performed based on a backward stepwise selection algorithm. Results: There were 232 patients with a mean (SD) Braden scale score of 14.9 (2.8) with a range from 9 to 23. The Braden scale (β = −.07 per point; 95% CI −0.09, −0.04, P <.001) was an independent predictor of increased LOS on UVA, but not on MVA when adjusted for other variables. For overall complications, as well as type of complication, the Braden scale score was not a significant predictor of complications on either UVA or MVA. Conclusion: In the sample population, the Braden scale did not demonstrate an ability to predict negative outcomes in head and neck surgery patients. Level of Evidence: Level 2b individual cohort study.
  • Authors

    Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • Grewal R; Sklar MC; de Almeida JR; Xu W; Su J; Thomas CM; Alibhai SMH; Goldstein DP
  • Start Page

  • 103
  • End Page

  • 108
  • Volume

  • 6
  • Issue

  • 1