Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease does not significantly alter major COVID-19 outcomes among veterans.

Academic Article

Abstract

  • Chronic kidney disease (CKD), as well as its common causes (e.g., diabetes and obesity), are recognized risk factors for severe COVID-19 illness. To explore whether the most common inherited cause of CKD, autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), is also an independent risk factor, we studied data from the VA health system and the VA COVID-19-shared resources (e.g., ICD codes, demographics, pre-existing conditions, pre-testing symptoms, and post-testing outcomes). Among 61 COVID-19-positive ADPKD patients, 21 (34.4%) were hospitalized, 10 (16.4%) were admitted to ICU, 4 (6.6%) required ventilator, and 4 (6.6%) died by August 18, 2020. These rates were comparable to patients with other cystic kidney diseases and cystic liver-only diseases. ADPKD was not a significant risk factor for any of the four outcomes in multivariable logistic regression analyses when compared with other cystic kidney diseases and cystic liver-only diseases. In contrast, diabetes was a significant risk factor for hospitalization [OR 2.30 (1.61, 3.30), p<0.001], ICU admission [OR 2.23 (1.47, 3.42), p<0.001], and ventilator requirement [OR 2.20 (1.27, 3.88), p=0.005]. Black race significantly increased the risk for ventilator requirement [OR 2.00 (1.18, 3.44), p=0.011] and mortality [OR 1.60 (1.02, 2.51), p=0.040]. We also examined the outcome of starting dialysis after COVID-19 confirmation. The main risk factor for starting dialysis was CKD [OR 6.37 (2.43, 16.7)] and Black race [OR 3.47 (1.48, 8.1)]. After controlling for CKD, ADPKD did not significantly increase the risk for newly starting dialysis comparing with other cystic kidney diseases and cystic liver-only diseases. In summary, ADPKD did not significantly alter major COVID-19 outcomes among veterans when compared to other cystic kidney and liver patients.
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  • Cui X; Gallini JW; Jasien CL; Mrug M