Nocturnal hypoxemia measured by polysomnogram is associated with acute chest syndrome in pediatric sickle cell disease

Academic Article

Abstract

  • Study Objectives: Nocturnal hypoxemia is associated with increased risk of sickle cell disease (SCD) complications. The association of nighttime hypoxemia and acute chest syndrome (ACS) in children with SCD has yet to be determined. Methods: This is a retrospective study of children with SCD who underwent polysomnography at a SCD center. Univariate logistic regression was used to assess the association between nocturnal hypoxemia and ACS admissions. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to verify the effects of different clinical covariates on ACS. Secondary analysis comparing patients with one vs multiple ACS admissions was performed. Results: One hundred ten individuals with SCD who completed their polysomnogram (mean age of 9.4 years) were identified. Fifty-nine (54%) had a history of at least one episode of ACS admission (mean age of 4.1 years), including 40 with multiple episodes. The percentage of total sleep time with O2saturation < 90% was greater in the ACS group (P <.05). Similarly, mean nocturnal O2saturation was lower in the ACS group (P <.0005). Mean nocturnal O2saturation of < 97.3% and the percentage of total sleep time with O2saturation < 90% higher than 2.7% were associated with ACS. There was no difference in nocturnal hypoxemia between patients with single and multiple ACS admissions. Conclusions: Nocturnal hypoxemia later in life is associated with previous ACS admissions in children with SCD. This can increase the yield of interpreting polysomnograms in this vulnerable population. Prospective studies are needed to determine the temporal relations of nocturnal hypoxemia and ACS, which may identify a modifiable risk for ACS.
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    Author List

  • Nourani AR; Rahman AKMF; Pernell B; Maddox MH; Hilliard L; Lebensburger J; Alishlash AS
  • Start Page

  • 219
  • End Page

  • 226
  • Volume

  • 17
  • Issue

  • 2