Relations of physical self-concept and self-efficacy with frequency of voluntary physical activity in preadolescents: Implications for after-school care programming

Academic Article

Abstract

  • Objective: This study aimed to test relations of physical self-concept and self-efficacy with voluntary physical activity in preadolescents enrolled in an after-school physical activity program. Methods: Participants in the 2003 (n=41) and 2005 (n=84) versions of the Youth Fit For Life protocol and the control group (n=40) completed the Physical Self-Concept scale, the Exercise Barriers Self-Efficacy Scale for Children, and a recall of physical activity frequency at Weeks 1 and 12. Results: Both treatment groups demonstrated significantly increased frequency of voluntary physical activity over 12 weeks. The 2005 version additionally demonstrated significant improvements in both physical self-concept and exercise barriers self-efficacy. Within the treatment groups, significant correlations between changes in physical self-concept and self-efficacy and physical activity sessions completed were found. Multiple regression indicated that 7% to 28% of the variance in voluntary physical activity was explained by the simultaneous entry of changes in physical self-concept and self-efficacy. Conclusion: Tenets of social cognitive and self-efficacy theory were supported and suggested that curricular elements of after-school care programming may increase overall outputs of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity in preadolescents. © 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Authors

    Published In

    Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Pubmed Id

  • 7619811
  • Author List

  • Annesi JJ
  • Start Page

  • 515
  • End Page

  • 520
  • Volume

  • 61
  • Issue

  • 4