Effects of improved self-appraisal and mood factors on weight loss in obese women initiating supported exercise

Academic Article

Abstract

  • This study aimed to test to what extent improvements in self-appraisal and mood factors were associated with changes in body mass index (BMI; kg/m 2) and waist circumference. Women with obesity (N=171) completed Physical Self-Concept, Exercise Self-Efficacy, Body Areas Satisfaction, Tension, and Depression scales, and were measured on BMI and waist circumference, at baseline and just after a 24-week supported exercise program. With the exception of Physical Self-Concept, improvements on each psychological factor were associated with significantly greater weight and waist circumference improvements. Multiple regression analyses indicated that improvement/non- improvement on the psychological factors explained a significant 9 to 11 percent of the variance in BMI change, and 13 to 20 percent of the variance in waist circumference change. Significant unique contributions to the explained variance in BMI were made by improvements in Exercise Self-Efficacy and Depression, with improvement in Tension also making significant unique contributions to the explained variance in waist circumference change. Consistent with tenets of social cognitive theory, the association of improvements in self-appraisal and mood factors with weight and waist circumference improvements was supported in obese women. Replications and extensions of this preliminary research to, ultimately, improve weight loss theory and treatment, was suggested. © 2011 Berkeley Electronic Press. All rights reserved.
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    Author List

  • Annesi JJ
  • Volume

  • 8
  • Issue

  • 1