Reactive nitrogen species, reactive oxygen species, transition metal ions, and the vascular system

Academic Article

Abstract

  • Free radicals, such as superoxide, hydroxyl and nitric oxide, and other 'reactive species', such as hydrogen peroxide, hypochlorous acid and peroxynitrite, are formed in vivo. Some of these molecules, e.g. superoxide and nitric oxide, can be physiologically useful, but they can also cause damage under certain circumstances. Excess production of reactive oxygen or nitrogen species (ROS, RNS), their production in inappropriate relative amounts (especially superoxide and NO.) or deficiencies in antioxidant defences may result in pathological stress to cells and tissues. This oxidative stress can have multiple effects. It can induce defence systems, and render tissues more resistant to subsequent insult. If oxidative stress is excessive or if defence and repair responses are inadequate, cell injury can be caused by such mechanisms as oxidative damage to essential proteins, lipid peroxidation, DNA strand breakage and base modification, and rises in the concentration of intracellular 'free' Ca2+. Considerable evidence supports the view that oxidative damage involving both ROS and RNS is an important contributor to the development of atherosclerosis. Peroxynitrite (derived by reaction of superoxide with nitric oxide) and transition metal ions (perhaps released by injury to the vessel wall) may contribute to lipid peroxidation in atherosclerotic lesions.
  • Published In

    Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • Darley-Usmar V; Halliwell B
  • Start Page

  • 649
  • End Page

  • 662
  • Volume

  • 13
  • Issue

  • 5