Elevated depressive affect is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes among African Americans with chronic kidney disease

Academic Article

Abstract

  • This study was designed to examine the impact of elevated depressive affect on health outcomes among participants with hypertensive chronic kidney disease in the African-American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK) Cohort Study. Elevated depressive affect was defined by Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) thresholds of 11 or more, above 14, and by 5-Unit increments in the score. Cox regression analyses were used to relate cardiovascular death/hospitalization, doubling of serum creatinine/end-stage renal disease, overall hospitalization, and all-cause death to depressive affect evaluated at baseline, the most recent annual visit (time-varying), or average from baseline to the most recent visit (cumulative). Among 628 participants at baseline, 42% had BDI-II scores of 11 or more and 26% had a score above 14. During a 5-year follow-up, the cumulative incidence of cardiovascular death/hospitalization was significantly greater for participants with baseline BDI-II scores of 11 or more compared with those with scores 11. The baseline, time-varying, and cumulative elevated depressive affect were each associated with a significant higher risk of cardiovascular death/hospitalization, especially with a time-varying BDI-II score over 14 (adjusted HR 1.63) but not with the other outcomes. Thus, elevated depressive affect is associated with unfavorable cardiovascular outcomes in African Americans with hypertensive chronic kidney disease. © 2011 International Society of Nephrology.
  • Published In

    Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • Fischer MJ; Kimmel PL; Greene T; Gassman JJ; Wang X; Brooks DH; Charleston J; Dowie D; Thornley-Brown D; Cooper LA
  • Start Page

  • 670
  • End Page

  • 678
  • Volume

  • 80
  • Issue

  • 6