Abdominal Incision Selection for Cesarean Delivery of Women with Class III Obesity

Academic Article

Abstract

  • Objective - The objective of this study was to evaluate cesarean outcomes, stratified by abdominal incision type, in women with class III obesity. Study Design - We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients with class III obesity undergoing cesarean at our institution from 2010 to 2013 with singletons ≥ 34 weeks. Outcomes were compared between patients with transverse subpannicular and vertical abdominal incisions. The primary outcome was a wound composite (cellulitis, abscess, hematoma, seroma, or dehiscence). Other outcomes included transfusion, vertical hysterotomy, 5-minute Apgar < 7, and umbilical artery pH < 7.10. Results - Of 423 patients, 364 had subpannicular transverse, 57 had vertical, and 2 had periumbilical transverse incisions (not analyzed). Although vertical incisions were associated with more wound complications (26.3 vs. 14.8%; p = 0.03), the difference became null after adjustment (adjusted odds ratios [aOR], 1.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7, 4.1). Vertical incisions were associated with increased risk of vertical hysterotomy (aOR 4.8; 95% CI, 2.2, 10.4), decreased risk of 5-minute Apgar < 7 (aOR, 0.06; 95% CI, 0.004, 0.9), and not statistically significantly associated with transfusion (aOR, 4.2; 95% CI, 0.9, 19.0) or umbilical artery pH < 7.1 (aOR, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.11, 1.7). Conclusions - In women with class III obesity cesarean delivery via vertical abdominal incisions is associated with more maternal but less immediate neonatal complications.
  • Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • Sutton AL; Sanders LB; Subramaniam A; Jauk VC; Edwards RK
  • Start Page

  • 547
  • End Page

  • 551
  • Volume

  • 33
  • Issue

  • 6